Posts Tagged ‘safety’

Relax

(February 16th, 2010)

Dear Planet Earth,

The far-away state of relaxation is one that is strived for by many.
In such a world where trecherous grey clouds haunt the sky like ghosts for hours
Where the dirty, mossy color of snow is spilt across the sidewalks and streets, pushed around by smog-expelling SUV’s and trucks.
Where nature just doesn’t make things turn out the way you want them to. When piles of mess push you back as you attempt to cross the sidewalk.
What’s the point of avoiding the outdoors? Since when has nature ever been a problem in our lives. The wild rabbits, deer, and other creatures deal with its severity, from strong winds to tempermental downpours of rain, why have humans just grown to go against it? We supply ourselves with soft, smooth, comforting homes to flee from the power of nature. We turn large ceder trees into chairs and tables to adjust to our so called “human-ness”. We are happy… but are we really?
I mean, inside such buildings the same sources of threat from outdoors  flow indirectly into mental and physical pain of being indoors.
Lack of sunlight, headaches and nausea from overuse of computers, iPods, and televisions. There is no safe place, it seems.
Stuck inside a power-ridden house after a thunderstorm crashes through the air. Trapped inside a hidden jail. Where is a safe place now?
Where can I go for relaxation?
Beach- in our minds we see the pleasently structured sand, the endless waves, and eternal sunlight. Heading towards the nearest beach is a trash-contaminated nightmare. The grinding of sand against your tired feet. After the water, any part of the beach sticks with you as you depart. Real and ideal collide, forming a cluster of mixed messages.
So where is relaxation exactly? Over there? Over here? Well, it could be anywhere if you set your mind to it.

Childhood III – Height

footYou hold on to your mother’s hand while crossing the street in the city. You hold on for your life; it’s like clinging on to a vine that will keep you suspended from the dangers below.  It is the only thing that separates you from safety and the dangers of the outside world: the cars on the road and the hundreds of strangers around you. It really isn’t that easy being such an age. Because you are so short, it forces you to look up to everyone and everything. It is even more frightening from below. The city is like a rainforest. The emergent layer (the older adults) walk through life knowing that they have nothing to worry about; the sun is shining on them, it is nice to feel tall and in power. They are headed of to their high paying jobs at large businesses. The canopy layer (the younger adults) aren’t that high up in society, but they have an idea of where they are heading to. The understory layer (the teenagers) are looking for a direction to head in, they still have enough freedom to wander the forest alone. And finally, there is the forest floor (the children) the darkest, scariest layer where young ones are forced into the lowest rung of society and have to look up to everyone else from the floor. It really is a no-brainer why children love to crawl on the floor in public places. They know they are at the bottom of the ladder, so why not have fun while you can before heading into all the dangers of climbing up? Most people don’t realize it, but the floor is a big part of what makes a child a child. The floor is where they play with blocks, dolls, and other toys, while grown men would huddle around a table to play a card game. The floor is where they learn; like first learning how to walk in early childhood, while people of older age sit in hard, cold desks. The floor is where they have story time, while adults sit in chairs to read. Why would someone at such an age want to use a chair? I remember at school assemblies, they always had the preschoolers sit on the floor while the older kids sat on the bleachers. Remember when you had to sit pretzel-style on the floor? I remember being so excited to sit like that with the other kids. Now that I am older, I am no longer flexible enough to do that again. In music class all the kids would sit pretzel-style and the teacher would just sit in a chair on the outside and instruct everyone. The teacher was always higher than the student. Even now when we have to sit in a chair, the teacher just stands up to instruct. Anyway, when you are young you have your own position in society. Of course you may not like it, or even realize it at the time on account of how much fun it was to sit on the nice, comfy carpet, but it sticks with you, and changes as you get older and more mature.

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Edited By Mark Savin