Posts Tagged ‘parents’

Childhood VIII: Moving On

Sometimes the cards we are dealt are not always fair. However you must keep smiling & moving on (Jackson).

I came home today from school and noticed the mail already dispersed over the table. My eye catches on the latest Nickelodeon Magazine; I become excited in my head, getting to see one of my favorite magazines finally make it. Something catches my eye though. There is a note attached to the inside flap of the magazine, which says

This issue, the 159th of NICKELODEON MAGAZINE, will be our final one. Yes, we know- it’s sad news. For the last 16 years it has been our pleasure and privilege to entertain and educate you. And we hope that our many, many loyal readers have enjoyed every issue of what we think was a fantastic kids’ magazine. It’s one of our greatest joys to meet people who grew up with Nick Mag. One thing we’re really proud of is that we’ve helped instill in them a lifelong love of reading…. Often, when we tell people that we work at Nick Mag, their first response is, “Wow! That must be so much fun!” Yes it was. Thank you again, Laura Galen, Senior Vice President/ Editorial Director, and the magazine staff.

I was heartbroken when I heard the news that Nick Magazine was ending its  production. I was one of the many that grew up reading it. The magazine came out the exact year and month I was born, so it was pretty easy to tell how much the magazine aged as I had, and so I felt a connection to it. Of course, at heart Nick Mag is still a kid, even though I am well into growing up, and so putting it to a rest to me is growing out of it. Gosh, I had so many memories when reading the magazine. I especially loved the comics, the monthly themes of articles, and the hundreds of pranks that kept me laughing. I used to collect every single magazine that came in the mail and I would read them repetitively in my room or anywhere around the house. They never got old; I could just go back to reading an issue from months ago and have it all be new to me. My parents would get upset because they took up took much room on my shelves and had me get rid of them, but I kept on saving them to look at in my free time. As a grew up, I’d backed down on keeping strict attention to every page, and I’ve started to move on with my own life, focusing on schoolwork and other people or things that interested me. At heart, I still am a kid, and this magazine is definitely difficult to lay down in a grave to be lost forever. It really is hard to move on sometimes.

I’m moving again. In the past it has been pretty upsetting to move, I mean anyone can relate: having to pack everything in boxes, having to throw out anything that takes up too much space or things that you don’t need anymore. It’s really difficult to have to throw away toys or games that you’ve played when you were little. I felt so cold inside when my dad told me I had to throw out all of my teddy bears before the move to our next house. I mean, I guess I was growing up and didn’t play with them anymore, but still, they were mine, and I had loved them at the time and didn’t want to see them go away to be donated or thrown out. Moving on is like one of those friendship bracelets in the shape of a hear that is split down the middle. One friend gets one half while the other gets to have the other half. By throwing these toys and games away, it’s just taking a part of that friendship bracelet and destroying it, being left with half of a heart, lonesome, useless, and meaningless. The memories remain in that one half of the heart, but it feels depression because of the lost other co-part. It is agony having to push something away from you that you used to cherish. Parents don’t understand that; they don’t understand those feelings that come into play before a big move. If only they understood and had you keep all of those things from childhood that you used to enjoy. It’s nice to look back on what you used to love later in life, to show it to your children or grandchildren and have them understand your memories you’ve had.


Childhood IV – Responsibilities

Job, school, work, homework, friends, making your own plans, following directions; these are all responsibilities one assumes as they grow up. When you’re a little tike, you may have a few responsibilities, such as following the ‘golden rule.’ Or perhaps you have to apologize to someone for stepping on their foot. Adults try to give a couple of responsibilities to start out with in order to shape you up for balancing even more. They hope that these will form you into a more responsible person when you get older. For example, they encourage you to be responsible for your language.

“Remember when you were in kindergarten and the teachers always told you to be polite? They would always to tell you that you should never call anyone in the classroom “weird” or “stupid”. This little lesson, they hoped, would help you grow up profanity free and become a polite adult” (Clonez, 4/11/09).

It really wasn’t a big deal at the time, but as you grow older, you are held a lot more responsible, like contributing to society by having a job or paying attention in school, which means you are obligated to do homework, and if you don’t, that teacher will hold you responsible and punish you with a bad grade.

Personally, I am a quite responsible person. I’m not old enough to have a job yet, but I go to school, I learn, I get outstanding grades, but that’s pretty much the extent of it. I’m very forgetful when it comes to doing things around the house, which makes my mom mad. She punishes me by taking things away, to try to make me more responsible.

There are ways that parents try and use what you love against you to make you more responsible. Although this may sound a little confusing at first, it really is pretty simple. For me, I just love to cook in the house on my own. No matter what dish I may be making, there is always a mess to clean up afterward. Parents try to shape you correctly from the start by using your favorite activities to make you responsible. My parents use to always tell me to clean up after cooking, and that is what I’ve started to do, even without them telling me.

As a 14 year old, I’m also responsible for making friends and coming up with my own plans, which I am not good at, at all. I get really anxious when it comes to making friends, so I don’t have any. I just have five or so really close friends who I do things with. However, most of the time I am just at home. None of my friends feel like doing anything, which leads me to have to make my own fun. I’m bad at that too. If I have no one to talk to, I just turn into a vegetable and watch TV until one of my friends becomes available. Not fun. At all.

Connor

Edited By Mark Savin