Posts Tagged ‘kids’

Childhood VI – Reading

“There are perhaps no days of our childhood we lived so fully as those we spent with a favorite book” (Proust). Growing up with reading is something that I will cherish for a long time. I remember starting out reading books by Dr. Seuss, one of the most famous childrens’ authors of all time. I always enjoyed the illustrations on each page and how each one has a burst of creativity on it. They were the kind of images that could never escape your mind. Of course now, all the English teachers at my school criticize them by saying that they can be misleading and it is what limits the child’s creativity. Well, I completely disagree with that; children use those pictures as a guide to help them understand the reading at such an early age. They can not be held accountable for understanding every word in the text.  Anyway, it seems as though every kid in America at one time was read a picture book before going to bed or curled up in a parents lap next to a fireplace. These classic stories continue on into the later years- even after that child has grown up. Don’t think they go away forever! You might end up reading it to your child or grandchild… or better yet… see a movie based on that book! Over the years, books have been transformed into movies with an extended plot line. This weekend, Cloudy With A Chance Of Meatballs was released as a movie; one of my favorite books to read as a child.

With no doubt, the one that the public is most excited for is the movie Where The Wild Things Are, which is released October 16th. The preview of the film looks so deep; it sends shivers down the spine… “Inside all of us is hope, fear,  adventure, and a wild thing” I’ve heard that the director added an extended plot to that movie to give it a realistic meaning.  I found out a pretty nice selection of artwork for the movie created by a large number of artists with different renditions. Click Here. Even if you are now past childhood, it really still is a movie for everyone. It’s nice to look back at those earlier years and this movie provides a key to that gate that has locked up your childhood forever. See the movie and release your inner wild thing; it has been waiting to come out all these years!

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Childhood IV – Responsibilities

Job, school, work, homework, friends, making your own plans, following directions; these are all responsibilities one assumes as they grow up. When you’re a little tike, you may have a few responsibilities, such as following the ‘golden rule.’ Or perhaps you have to apologize to someone for stepping on their foot. Adults try to give a couple of responsibilities to start out with in order to shape you up for balancing even more. They hope that these will form you into a more responsible person when you get older. For example, they encourage you to be responsible for your language.

“Remember when you were in kindergarten and the teachers always told you to be polite? They would always to tell you that you should never call anyone in the classroom “weird” or “stupid”. This little lesson, they hoped, would help you grow up profanity free and become a polite adult” (Clonez, 4/11/09).

It really wasn’t a big deal at the time, but as you grow older, you are held a lot more responsible, like contributing to society by having a job or paying attention in school, which means you are obligated to do homework, and if you don’t, that teacher will hold you responsible and punish you with a bad grade.

Personally, I am a quite responsible person. I’m not old enough to have a job yet, but I go to school, I learn, I get outstanding grades, but that’s pretty much the extent of it. I’m very forgetful when it comes to doing things around the house, which makes my mom mad. She punishes me by taking things away, to try to make me more responsible.

There are ways that parents try and use what you love against you to make you more responsible. Although this may sound a little confusing at first, it really is pretty simple. For me, I just love to cook in the house on my own. No matter what dish I may be making, there is always a mess to clean up afterward. Parents try to shape you correctly from the start by using your favorite activities to make you responsible. My parents use to always tell me to clean up after cooking, and that is what I’ve started to do, even without them telling me.

As a 14 year old, I’m also responsible for making friends and coming up with my own plans, which I am not good at, at all. I get really anxious when it comes to making friends, so I don’t have any. I just have five or so really close friends who I do things with. However, most of the time I am just at home. None of my friends feel like doing anything, which leads me to have to make my own fun. I’m bad at that too. If I have no one to talk to, I just turn into a vegetable and watch TV until one of my friends becomes available. Not fun. At all.

Connor

Edited By Mark Savin


Childhood III – Height

footYou hold on to your mother’s hand while crossing the street in the city. You hold on for your life; it’s like clinging on to a vine that will keep you suspended from the dangers below.  It is the only thing that separates you from safety and the dangers of the outside world: the cars on the road and the hundreds of strangers around you. It really isn’t that easy being such an age. Because you are so short, it forces you to look up to everyone and everything. It is even more frightening from below. The city is like a rainforest. The emergent layer (the older adults) walk through life knowing that they have nothing to worry about; the sun is shining on them, it is nice to feel tall and in power. They are headed of to their high paying jobs at large businesses. The canopy layer (the younger adults) aren’t that high up in society, but they have an idea of where they are heading to. The understory layer (the teenagers) are looking for a direction to head in, they still have enough freedom to wander the forest alone. And finally, there is the forest floor (the children) the darkest, scariest layer where young ones are forced into the lowest rung of society and have to look up to everyone else from the floor. It really is a no-brainer why children love to crawl on the floor in public places. They know they are at the bottom of the ladder, so why not have fun while you can before heading into all the dangers of climbing up? Most people don’t realize it, but the floor is a big part of what makes a child a child. The floor is where they play with blocks, dolls, and other toys, while grown men would huddle around a table to play a card game. The floor is where they learn; like first learning how to walk in early childhood, while people of older age sit in hard, cold desks. The floor is where they have story time, while adults sit in chairs to read. Why would someone at such an age want to use a chair? I remember at school assemblies, they always had the preschoolers sit on the floor while the older kids sat on the bleachers. Remember when you had to sit pretzel-style on the floor? I remember being so excited to sit like that with the other kids. Now that I am older, I am no longer flexible enough to do that again. In music class all the kids would sit pretzel-style and the teacher would just sit in a chair on the outside and instruct everyone. The teacher was always higher than the student. Even now when we have to sit in a chair, the teacher just stands up to instruct. Anyway, when you are young you have your own position in society. Of course you may not like it, or even realize it at the time on account of how much fun it was to sit on the nice, comfy carpet, but it sticks with you, and changes as you get older and more mature.

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Edited By Mark Savin