Posts Tagged ‘everlost’

Just When I Thought I’d Gotten Over Young Adult Books

I was first introduced to the Skinjacker trilogy when the first novel, ‘Everlost’ was a reading option for my Sophomore high school final project. The storyline sounded absolutely breathtaking. The book follows two children, Nick and Allie, who get into a car accident one day and end up lost in this world between life and death. The three books in the series follow the aspirations of them, as well as those of several other characters along the way. Each character has something that defines them and entwines them with this story.

Nick represents the child who has died, forgets himself in this world of limbo, and works to discover that his real purpose is helping greensouls (newly dead children) to make their way off into the “light at the end of the tunnel”, or the metaphorical afterlife. In the meantime, he transforms into a sort of ‘chocolate ogre’ after he forgets his original appearance. Everything that a person wears on himself transfers into this world of Everlost, and because Nick had a smudge of chocolate on his face upon dying, this insignificant feature eventually took him over and turned him into a beast. For Nick especially, it was interesting to watch how manipulations has a strong impact on him throughout this series, yet up the end, he stayed true to himself thanks to Allie.

Allie is a rather complex character; she is a very independent person who sticks up for her beliefs when attacked. Allie seeks to befriend the beast known as the McGill, who other Everlost children have grown to fear. What is great about Allie is that she transcends all omens or rumors thrown at her about how spooky and scary a place Everlost is. In a Beauty and The Beast Story, the two of them fall in love with one another over time and the McGill transforms back into his original  human state as Mikey McGill and sticks close to Allie for the rest of the trilogy. What is unique about Allie is her possession of the rare power of skinjacking, which is when an Everlost soul can jump into the lives of the living world. This power comes to be very useful in her victory in book three. She discovers that those who can skinjack aren’t really dead, but actually in a coma. Knowing this, she forms the deep wish to make things right before going back and possessing her own body again, returning to her old life. Of course, you may ask why would Allie want to settle disputes in Everlost first, instead of jumping straight back. Well, this is because of the heartless, despicable afterlight (Everlost inhabitant) that you will grow to hate, Mary Hightower.

Throughout this series, I’ve grown to hate everything that Mary stands for more and more. Although her views aren’t necessarily wrong or twisted, which makes her a credible antagonist, they tamper with the forces of the living world. Mary Hightower has the strong view that Everlost souls are in this world to stay in this state of limbo and continue out the same routine for the rest of eternity, instead of going off “into the light”. She becomes a power-hungry, manipulating backstabber, taking advantage of the hearts of many skinjackers, giving them the duty to take over bodies in the living world and mass murder as many people as they can, which is why Allie wants to stay to put a stop to Mary’s scheme. By killing bodies and capturing souls before they go off “into the light” Mary plans to build up an army of afterlights and become the greatest ruler of Everlost. What bothers me the most about Mary is that she has such a polite and innocent façade, yet has dark ambitions of wiping out every living creature on Earth. Just like every other character in this book, Mary is just very complex. When we first meet her in the first novel, she seems to be the greatest source of knowledge and understanding in this unknown world, which is why many, including myself, draw to her, she even writes her own guides to give to new souls on how to “live” in this new land. Her views originally seem so right and just, until over the course of the trilogy we come across a plethora of viewpoints that make Mary seem like a snot-nosed brat.

Throughout the trilogy, I’ve grown attached to these plot changes that Neal Shusterman has thrown into the mix of this delightful read. Nothing in this series is ever predictable, which makes me want to drool over each page like a hungry dog. The main idea that swirls throughout the batter of this entire trilogy is the meaning of time spent in one’s afterlife, which becomes a heated source of debate in this cold lifeless world of Everlost. I would definitely recommend this series to anyone.

Michael

P.S: Happy 200th Post to myself 🙂